Were You Injured Because Of Someone Else's Negligence? Browse Our FAQs

In addition to coping with a lot of stress and frustration, personal injury cases also come with a lot of questions. Here are some of the questions we hear the most at Max Meyers Law.

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  • How Should I Prepare a Motorcycle for Winter Storage?

    Motorcycle With Cover Parked on StreetPutting your motorcycle away for the winter to protect it from the elements and doing the right maintenance can ensure it is ready to hit the road in the spring. Block off a few days to follow these steps and extend the life of your bike.

    Should I Change the Oil Before Putting My Motorcycle Up for the Winter?

    Yes. The contaminants found in dirty oil can corrode your engine. Run your motorcycle for a few minutes, then drain the oil and replace it with the oil your owner’s manual recommends.

    Also fill your gas tank and add a fuel stabilizer, then start your bike. Let the stabilizer run through your fuel system. Never leave your gas tank half-empty over the winter. Rust can develop inside the gas tank if it is not full, and varnish can form in the engine if the gas does not contain a stabilizer.

    How Do I Charge the Battery While My Bike is in Storage?

    The best way to keep the battery charged without frying it is to use a battery charger and minder. An overcharged battery can not only be unusable, it can also explode. Remove the battery and connect it to a battery charger and minder.

    What Maintenance Will My Motorcycle Need Before Winter Storage?

    Check your tires and make sure they have the correct pressure. Lube the cables and chains and do any other maintenance your owner’s manual recommends. Some motorcycle enthusiasts suggest that you clean the carburetors in the fall to prevent “gunk.”

    You should also prevent rodents and other small animals from nesting in your mufflers for the winter by either inserting motorcycle exhaust plugs in the mufflers or at least placing a plastic bag over the cooled muffler and securing it with a rubber band.

    Should I Wash My Motorcycle Before Putting it in Storage for the Winter?

    Yes. Dirt and bugs on your bike can cause corrosion or rust. After completing all the service and maintenance, give it a thorough wash, let it dry in the sun, then wax it to protect the paint.

    What Should I Use to Cover My Motorcycle for the Winter?

    Whether you store your bike indoors or outside, you should protect it with a cover. Do not just throw a plastic tarp over your motorcycle, because it will trap moisture. Your bike’s chrome, painted surfaces, and internal parts can corrode from trapped moisture. Use a breathable cover designed for use with motorcycles. Make sure your bike has completely cooled before you cover it.

    Where Should I Store My Motorcycle for the Winter?

    You have several viable options. Many dealerships offer indoor heated storage. You can also rent a heated storage unit or store your bike in your garage or shed. Heated storage is preferable to unheated. If you do not have an indoor location for your motorcycle to spend the winter, park it on a plywood sheet and cover it up, recommends Consumer Reports.

    What Equipment Do I Need to Winterize My Motorcycle?

    You will need these items to perform the required maintenance on your bike before putting it into winter storage:

    • Your owner’s manual
    • Bucket, sponge, car washing soap
    • Hose and water
    • Clean rags
    • Motorcycle oil and filter
    • Oil funnel and pan
    • Gasoline in a container
    • Motorcycle gasoline stabilizer
    • Battery charger and minder
    • Motorcycle exhaust plugs
    • Breathable motorcycle cover
    • Any parts and tools needed to complete additional maintenance your owner’s manual recommends

    Should I Carry Insurance on My Motorcycle When It Is in Storage?

    Yes. Verify that your motorcycle insurance will cover your bike for possible damage that can occur during storage. Your bike is expensive, so it is worth the cost of premiums to protect it, even if you are not regularly riding during Washington State’s winter months.

    Max Meyers Law helps motorcyclists injured in wrecks that other drivers cause. If you suffer injuries in a motorcycle accident that was not your fault, call us today at 425-242-5595. We also invite you to read our eBook, Motorcycle Accident Secrets Unlocked.

  • What is the motorcycle accident claims process in Washington?

    What is the motorcycle accident claims process in Washington?

    If you were in a motorcycle accident in Washington, your first step in the claims process is to contact your insurance company as soon as reasonably possible. Be careful of what you say during this conversation. Your insurance company may record your phone call and use any admission of fault against you during the claims process.

    Provide as much factual information as possible, including the accident report number and the name, badge number, and branch of law enforcement of any responding officers. Also provide the names, contact information, and insurance information for the other drivers.

    If your insurance company asks about the extent of your injuries or the amount of damage to your motorcycle, do not speculate. Tell them you will share this information when you know the full extent of each.

    The motorcycle accident attorneys at Max Meyers Law can help you obtain documentation of your medical and repair costs to present to your insurance company. We can also protect your interests during the claims process to be sure you receive a fair settlement.

    What is the motorcycle accident claims process in Washington.

    How is liability determined after a motorcycle crash?

    If the other driver was completely at fault for your crash, your insurance company will negotiate with the other driver's insurance company to pay for your damages.

    The insurance company may only offer to cover out-of-pocket expenses like medical bills, property damage, and lost wages. Our lawyers can help you negotiate a settlement that covers these expenses and includes compensation for your pain and suffering.

    If the other driver was at fault but uninsured, you can still get compensation for your damages through your own uninsured motorist coverage. If your uninsured motorist coverage has low policy limits, we can take action against the uninsured driver for additional compensation.

    What if I was at fault for my accident?

    If you were completely at fault in the accident, your insurance will cover your damages and will pay compensation to the other driver. If your insurance limits are too low to pay all the damages of the other driver, he can sue you for the difference.

    If you and the other driver were both partly at fault in the accident, you can make claims against each other. Washington is a pure comparative fault state, so the amount of your negligence will reduce the amount of money you recover.

    If it is unclear who was at fault, both sides will investigate the accident. Our lawyers will investigate the accident and collect the evidence like the accident report, eyewitness reports, expert testimony, or security camera footage to prove what happened.

    How do I calculate my damages?

    We will need to calculate the value of any property damage, injuries, and other recoverable damages you sustained. We can obtain documentation to prove expenses like:

    • Medical bills detailing the treatment of your injuries;
    • Estimations of future medical care costs like prescription drugs, rehabilitation, ongoing care, or costs associated with a disability;
    • The cost to repair or replace your motorcycle; and
    • Lost wages and lost earning potential.
       

    Disfigurement, pain and suffering, and loss of companionship are difficult concepts to negotiate with an insurance company. We will fight hard to get you the compensation you deserve for these damages.

    What is the negotiation process like?

    We will negotiate with the insurance company on your behalf. We will present our calculation of your damages and work with them to establish a fair settlement.

    During the negotiation process, you have the final say in accepting a settlement. We can advise you on when to accept an offer from your insurance company.

    How can I receive my settlement?

    Once we reach an agreement with the insurance company, they will present the terms of the agreement and a waiver for review.

    The waiver is a document in which you agree never to file another claim for this accident. This is why it is essential that you do not settle until you know how your crash will affect your health and your ability to work.

    After you sign these documents, we will file them with your insurance company so you can receive your settlement and begin your recovery.

    How can I get help with the motorcycle accident claims process?

    At Max Meyers Law, we will fight hard to protect your rights after a motorcycle crash. We will meet with you and evaluate your claim. Call us today at 425-242-5595 to schedule your free, no-obligation consultation.

  • How to Get a Motorcycle License in Washington State

    To get a motorcycle license in Washington state, you need to visit an approved motorcycle training school and complete one of two riding assessments.

    Option #1: Pass a Knowledge and Skills Test

    Your first option is to pass a knowledge and riding skills test. The knowledge portion of this test will simply measure your understanding of the state’s driving laws and how to safely operate a motorcycle. Questions may include:

    • How to swerve correctly
    • What to do if your tire goes flat while riding
    • How a passenger riding your motorcycle should be positioned


    The riding skills portion will require you to put your knowledge to action by demonstrating your ability to legally and safely operate your motorcycle.

    This skills assessment includes the following five tasks:

    1. Cone weave and normal stop
    2. Turn from a stop and U-turn
    3. Obstacle swerve
    4. Quick stop
    5. Curves


    (Note: you can click on each of the riding skills tasks to see a brief demonstration.)

    After passing your knowledge and riding skills test, you will be given a green score sheet, which you will then need to take to a Washington State licensing office within 180 days to claim your motorcycle license.

    Option #2: Take a Motorcycle Safety Course

    Your second option for acquiring a motorcycle license in Washington is to successfully complete a motorcycle safety course at an approved motorcycle training school.

    Find the training school nearest you.

    This safety course includes the knowledge and riding skills tests. Once you have passed the course, you will receive a course completion card, which you will need to take to a licensing office within 180 days to claim your motorcycle license.

    Find the licensing office nearest you.

    Additional Motorcycle Licensing Requirements in Washington

    The Washington State Department of Licensing expressly states that additional steps are required to secure your motorcycle license if you meet any of the following criteria:

    Under 18 years of age

    Riders under the age of 18 must pass an approved rider course and receive parental permission to take the course before they can apply for a motorcycle endorsement.

    Valid out-of-state motorcycle license or endorsement

    New Washington residents with an out-of-state license need to follow these five simple steps to receive their Washington motorcycle license:

    • Establish residency in Washington
    • Choose between a standard or enhanced driver license
    • Check if you can pre-apply online
    • Visit a local driver licensing office
    • Get your motorcycle license

    Non-resident stationed here on military duty

    Non-residents must successfully complete a state-approved safety course at a motorcycle training school or military base.

    Once you have passed the course and applied for a Washington driver’s license, you will have 180 days to bring your completion card to a licensing office to get your motorcycle endorsement.

    Washington resident stationed in another state on military duty

    Washington residents living out of state must complete and pass:

    • An approved Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) course
    • A Basic Rider Training course (if in Idaho or Oregon)
    • Motorcyclist Safety Program Training (if in California)


    After completing the required assignment, gather the following documentation:

    • Copy of your Washington driver license (both sides)
    • Copy of your course completion card (both sides)
    • Proof of active duty military status
    • Notice of Surrender form for an Enhanced Driver License (EDL) – if you have an EDL, you must surrender it to get a motorcycle license


    You will need to send a letter requesting a motorcycle endorsement, along with this supporting documentation and a small fee, to:

    The Washington State Department of Licensing
    646 Okoma Drive Suite E
    Omak, WA 98841-9515

    Permit Requirements and Restrictions for Permit Holders

    Any rider who is at least 16 years of age and has a valid Washington State driver’s license can apply for a motorcycle permit after successfully passing a motorcycle operation knowledge test.

    Riders under 18 must have a parent or guardian sign a consent form. After receiving a permit, it will be valid for 90 days.

    To renew your permit for an additional 90 days, you will need to visit a licensing office and pay a renewal fee. In order to renew your permit, you must meet these requirements:

    1. Passed the knowledge test within the past 180 days
    2. Had no more than on permit in the past five years

    If you need a third permit, bring documentation of your enrollment in a motorcycle training course to the licensing office.

    Note: It is important for permit holders to remember that while riding a motorcycle on a public roadway in Washington State, it is against the law for them to carry passengers or to ride while it is dark.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Q: Do I Need a Motorcycle License to Ride a Moped?

    A: You do not need a motorcycle license to operate a moped in Washington State. Only a valid driver’s license.

    Washington State Legislation RCW 46.20.500 states that any person 16 or older, who holds a valid driver’s license of any class issued by the state, “may operate a moped without taking any special examination for the operation of a moped.”

    Q: Do I Need a Motorcycle License to Ride an Electric Bike?

    A: You do not need a motorcycle license to operate an electric bike in Washington State.

    Washington State Legislation RCW 46.20.500 states that, “no driver's license is required for operation of an electric-assisted bicycle if the operator is at least sixteen years of age.”

    Important Notice for Unlicensed Motorcyclists

    Remember: It is illegal to operate a motorcycle in the state of Washington without a valid license or permit.

    However, if you are ever in an accident without a license, it may not mean you are at fault. You can still file a claim even if you do not have a valid motorcycle license.

    Simply call Max Meyers Law now at 425-242-5595, or toll-free at 888-230-4970 for help after an accident. Also download our free guide, Motorcycle Secrets Unlocked for more on motorcycle accidents and insurance claims.

  • Is the driver making the turn always at fault for a left turn motorcycle accident?

    “Right of way" laws exist to make it clear what each person’s obligation is when proceeding through. If you or someone you care about suffered injuries in a left turn motorcycle accident, you need the help of an attorney to know what your rights are. Contact Washington car accident attorney Max Meyers Law PLLC today.

    What does Washington law say about right of way?

    Washington state statute § WPI 70.02.01 states that any driver intending to turn left at an intersection "shall yield the right of way" to any oncoming car or other vehicle approaching from a reasonable distance.

    However, the right is not absolute. The statute goes on to say that, "The duty to exercise ordinary care to avoid collisions at intersections rests upon both drivers." However, the statute clarifies, that it is the left-turning driver's primary duty and responsibility to maintain "a fair margin of safety at all times."

    So what does this mean in all practicality? It is clear that the liability for a left-hand turn would usually rest on the driver making that turn. So, for example, if the driver did not have his turn signal on and the oncoming motorcyclist had no way of knowing that the driver intended to turn, this would support liability on the part of the driver.

    However, on the other hand, if the motorcyclist was traveling while intoxicated or otherwise impaired and simply failed to pay attention to the driver's turn signal, he may be liable for the accident.

    What evidence would be relevant in such a case?

    Sometimes fault is straightforward; other times it is complicated and highly contested. Evidence to support the determination of which party was responsible for the accident may include:

    • Witness statements
    • Photographs
    • Surveillance video
    • Testimony from drivers and passengers

    So what should you do?

    Left turn motorcycle accidents can be serious and the injuries sustained can be severe. But you also need to recognize that the legal issues involved can be complex and more than you should try to handle by yourself.

    If you or someone you care about was hurt in a left turn accident, contact Max Meyers Law PLLC at 425-242-5595 or fill out our online contact form for a free consultation.

  • What causes single-vehicle motorcycle accidents?

    The most common causes of single-vehicle motorcycle accidents include speeding, alcohol and drugs, bad road conditions, and malfunction. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), of the 4,668 fatal motorcycle accidents in the U.S. in 2013, 22 percent were single-vehicle motorcycle accidents with a fixed object. 

    A 22-percent fixed object collision rate eclipses the other types.

    • Eighteen percent fatal accidents caused by passenger cars
    • Fourteen percent for light trucks
    • Four percent for large commercial trucks

     

    Their two wheels and light weight increase the odds that a motorcycle will skid, slide, or topple; commonly called “lay-downs.”

    Lay-downs are most frequent under these conditions.

    • During poor weather (rain, ice, high winds)
    • On curved streets and road,
    •  With inexperienced riders

    Speeding

    The NHTSA views motorcycle crashes to be caused (or related) to the biker speeding if they were either charged with a speeding, or if police mention speeding in their accident reports as a contributing factor by the biker: either driving too fast for traffic or road conditions, or exceeded the posted speed limit.

    Its 2013 report listed biker speeding as the cause in 34 percent of fatal crashes; again, the largest category when compared to the others.

    • Passenger car drivers driving above the posted limit (32 percent)
    • Light truck speeders (18 percent)
    • Large commercial truckers (eight percent)

    Alcohol and Drugs

    In fatal crashes in 2013, The NHTSA concluded that motorcycle riders involved in all crashes had higher percentages of “substance” impairment than any other type of motor vehicle operator (27 percent).

    • Passenger car drivers (23 percent)
    • Light-truck drivers (21 percent)
    • Semi trucks (two percent)

     

    Bad road conditions and sudden road hazards also contribute to a large number of bike wrecks. Often, obstacles such as tree branches and items that fall into the street from other vehicles; and even confusing road signs, can cause experienced riders to suddenly react and lose their “biker balance” – sending them into an uncontrollable skid.

    In any event, those responsible for the road obstacle; or careless drivers who cause single bike accidents, may be held liable for injuries suffered by the motorcycle rider.

    Vehicle Malfunction

    A failure of the bike or problems with a motorcycle part can make it impossible to operate safely the bike. Defects like braking and steering problems can increase the risk of a motorcycle accident. The Honda brake recalled in 2011, and 2013 come immediately to mind. But faulty replacement parts or poor repair services can also send a motorcycle careening out of control.

    High Performance Bikes

    The NHTSA also mentioned that even though high performance “racing” bikes (Sport and Supersport models) make up a small percentage of the total number of motorcycles on the road, they account for a disproportionately larger percentage of bike accidents.

    The NHTSA notes increases in fatal accidents with bikes that have larger engines over those with smaller ones. And a US Department of Transportation report in 2001 suggested the death rate among riders of high-performance motorcycles could be as much as twice that of conventional motorcycle riders.

    For a motorcycle accident lawyer after a crash in Washington State, contact Max Meyers Law at (888) 230-4970.

  • I was in a motorcycle accident without license. Can I still recover damages?

    It is against the law to ride a motorcycle in Washington State without a valid motorcycle license (unless riding with a valid permit, with which motorcyclists may not ride after dark or while carrying passengers).

    However, your lack of a valid permit or license may not mean that you’re automatically at fault for a motorcycle accident, nor does it ultimately impede your right to recover damages. Here’s what you need to know if you’re in a motorcycle accident and don’t have a license.

    Who was at fault?

    If the accident was 100 percent your fault, then you may be barred from recovering damages. If the accident was less than 100 percent your fault, then Washington State’s comparative negligence laws permit you to recover damages.

    However, motorcycle law also reads that your amount of damages diminishes in proportion to your percentage of the blame. In other words, you can file a claim, but if you were 15 percent at fault, then your damages award will be reduced by 15 percent.

    Even if you weren’t riding your motorcycle with a valid license at the time of the crash, the accident could still have been the fault of the other driver. If the collision would have occurred regardless of having a motorcycle license or not, you’ll need to prove it.

    Proving Fault

    To prove the fault of the other driver, you’ll have to demonstrate that the driver was doing something negligent that lead to the crash. Types of negligence may include this list.

    • Speeding
    • Running a red light
    • Following too closely
    • Driving while under the influence of drugs or alcohol
    • Driving too fast for the conditions

     

    You will need to collect evidence to prove negligence. Types of evidence that you should collect to substantiate your claim include the following listed.

    • Photographs of the accident scene/physical damage
    • Police reports
    • Witness testimony
    • Driver Blood Alcohol Content results
    • Video/camera footage

     

    If you can prove that the other driver was at fault, then you have the right to recover damages.

    How a Motorcycle Accident Attorney Can Help

    Even if you believe that the other driver was at fault, an insurance company may try to pin the responsibility for the accident on you based on the fact that you didn’t have a motorcycle license at the time of crash.

    For assistance in building a defense to this claim, call a Washington State motorcycle accident attorney at Max Meyers Law PLLC. For help in dealing with the insurance company, filing a claim, or proving fault, contact the motorcycle accident lawyer now at 425-242-5595. 

  • After a Kirkland motorcycle accident do I need to call my insurance company if the accident wasn’t my fault?

    Yes! Most insurance policies require you to report a motorcycle or motor vehicle accident within a certain amount of time of the accident.  This time frame is usually no more than 72 hours.  You need to do this even when the accident isn't your fault. Your failure to do so can result in the insurance company denying your claim for repair of your bike, payment of your medical bills or any other payments you may have been entitled to if you made a timely report of loss.

    You may not realize certain things following an accident are designed to going through your insurance first and then be repaid later by the at-fault driver's insurance company.  This is most common in PIP insurance when dealing with medical bills, but is also common for repair bills. 

    The biggest reason to report is in case the at-fault driver has no insurance or not enough insurance to cover all your medical bills, lost wages and any other harms and losses. In this scenario you may have uninsured motorist or underinsured motorist coverage on your motorcycle insurance design to help in this kind of situation. When your medical bills exceed the at-fault driver's insurance you need to make a underinsured motorist claim or you'll have to pay those bills yourself.  It's insurance coverage you bought just in case of this kind of worst case scenario, which unfortuanely is all to common in mototcycle accident cases. 

    In addition to contacting your insurance company, you should also contact a Kirkland motorcycle accident attorney, so that you can learn what your rights are before signing anything or speaking with the at fault driver's insurance company.  A good first step is to order our book "Motorcycle Accident Secrets Unlocked."

  • What is Underinsured Motorist (UIM) coverage?

    Underinsured Motorist (UIM) coverage is an optional type of insurance you buy on your auto insurance policy to protect you and your family against vehicles that have inadequate insurance coverage.  Many cars on Washington state roadways do not buy enough auto insurance to cover all the damages caused in a car accident.

    If you're seriously injured in a collision your doctor bills can quickly exceed the Washington state minimum insurance requirements of 25,000.  This is especially true for motorcycle and bicycle accidents.  A trip to the ER with broken bones or a serious head injury can easily cost over $10,000.  If you require surgery and several days in the hospital your doctor bills can push past the $25,000 quickly. 

    When an at-fault driver does not have enough insurance your UIM coverage is design to step in and supplement the at-fault party’s insurance.  It’s design to be another layer of protection for you.  Your UIM insurance will be asked to pay for all the damages you suffered in the accident caused by the negligence of at-fault driver.

    UIM insurance often pays:

    • Doctor bills
    • Lost wages
    • Out-of-pocket expenses (like special braces, crutches, wheel chair rental, etc.)
    • Mileage to and from doctor appointments
    • Intangible harms like pain & discomfort


    For example, assume you're seriously injured in a motorcycle accident and suffer a broken wrist and broken leg which both require surgery to repair at Harborview Medical Center.  You could easily have $40,000 in hospital bills and will miss three months of work resulting in $10,000 in lost wages.  

    If you have UIM insurance with a limit of $300,000 and the at-fault driver only had $25,000 of liability insurance, then the at-fault driver's insurance will likely pay its policy limits of $25,000 to you. (Assuming you have no fault in the accident.)  At that point your UIM insurance will step in and be responsible for paying the remaining medical bills, lost wages, other out-of-pocket expense, and fairly compensate you for all other harms and losses.  

    Note that this differs from Uninsured Motorist (UM) coverage, which covers you if the at-fault driver has no insurance or leaves the scene of the accident.

    If you’re in a serious injury accident in Washington and don’t know if there’s adequate insurance to pay your bills, you probably should call an experienced Washington accident attorney to learn more about your legal rights. If you have questions call us at (888) 230-4970.